Aesthetic Medicine Today
2009 American College of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists (ACOG) Evidence-Based Cervical
Screening Guidelines
Christina Cruz Dominguez
Staff Writer
and
Steven Dominguez, MD, MPH
Medical Editor

November 20, 2009 - The 2009 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
(ACOG) evidence-based Cervical Screening guidelines were issued today and
published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

These revised guidelines have remarkable changes limiting women’s current and
future healthcare access with resultant increased morbidity and mortality potential;
1.        Moving the baseline cervical screening to age 21 from within 3 years of first
intercourse
2.        Women from ages 21 to 30 may be screened every two years
3.        Women younger than 30 may have a cervical screening once every two years
instead of annually
4.        Women age 30 and older can be re-screened once every three years
5.        Stop cervical cancer screening at age 65 or 70
6.        These guidelines are applicable if the women has had three consecutive
negative cervical screening tests and is not immunocompromised.

The ACOG cites research revealing lower cancer rates of 50% in the last 30 years
(ed.: perhaps because of aggressive screening and early treatment protocols).  Other
data points used in developing the ACOG guidelines are:
•        increased cancer diagnosis and death rates in women who did not undergo
routine yearly cervical screening tests (ed.: this seems to argue against their own
revised guidelines).  
•        HPV cervical cancer is slow growing
•        Decreased healthcare costs will be recognized

Practice Bulletin #109, "Cervical Cytology Screening," is published in the December
2009 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Click here to read the entire Guideline:
http://www.acog.
org/from_home/publications/press_releases/nr11-20-09.cfm
Copyright © 2012 Aesthetic Medicine Today. All rights reserved.  
Written permission for abstracting and reproduction required.
Copyright © 2012 Aesthetic Medicine Today. All rights reserved.  
Written permission for abstracting and reproduction required.
quired.