2009 ACP Issues Guidelines for Treatment of Erectile
Dysfunction

October 23, 2009 — The American College of Physicians (ACP) has issued
recommendations for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in the October issue
of the Annals of Internal Medicine.  Erectile dysfunction is defined as the persistent
inability to achieve or maintain penile erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual
performance. Evaluation and consideration of treatment are indicated when ED
persists for at least 3 months.

The ACP recommendations in this clinical practice guideline are as follows:
1.        Clinicians begin treatment in men who seek treatment of ED and who have no
contraindication to their use
2.        Cinicians are to choose a specific treatment course based on the individual
preferences of men with ED, considering ease of use, cost of medication, and adverse
effects profile
3.        There is no opinion for or against routine use of hormonal blood tests or
hormonal therapy for patients with ED

The new clinical practice guidelines strongly urge physicians to begin therapy in men
who seek treatment of ED, unless they are receiving nitrate therapy or have another
contraindications.

Therefore, the guideline recommends that physicians prescribe based on individual
patient preferences, taking into account convenience and ease of use, medication
costs, and safety and adverse effects profile.

Risk factors for ED include advanced age, diabetes, vascular diseases, psychiatric
disorders, and possibly hypogonadism. Worldwide prevalence of ED exceeded 152
million in 1995, and with the graying of the population, it is estimated that it will be
approximately 322 million by the year 2025.

Regardless of the specific cause of ED, such as diabetes, depression, or prostate
cancer, or baseline severity, treatment was associated with statistically significant
and clinically meaningful improvements in sexual intercourse and in erectile function.
Aesthetic Medicine Today
Copyright © 2012 Aesthetic Medicine Today. All rights reserved.  
Written permission for abstracting and reproduction required.
Copyright © 2012 Aesthetic Medicine Today. All rights reserved.  
Written permission for abstracting and reproduction required.
Copyright © 2012 Aesthetic Medicine Today. All rights reserved.  
Written permission for abstracting and reproduction required.
quired.